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How to Make and Contribute a C-Kermit Binary

THIS PAGE IS NOT CURRENT. BINARIES CAN NO LONGER BE UPLOADED TO COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY, BUT THE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR UPLOADING BINARIES TO THE NEW WEBSITE HAVE NOT YET BEEN WORKED OUT.

[ Unix ] [ VMS ] [ Other ]

Unix

  1. Check the binaries table to make sure the binary you are about to make is not already there, or is not at the current C-Kermit release level (i.e. 9.0.301). Alternatively, use FTP:

      $ ftp kermit.columbia.edu
      User: anonymous
      Password: olga@xyzcorp.com
      ftp> cd kermit/bin
      ftp> dir ck[cu]301*
      ftp> bye
      $
    

  2. Make a fresh directory and 'cd' to it. Example:

      $ mkdir kermit
      $ cd kermit
    

  3. Download the appropriate source code archive. Click on the download link or do it by hand the old-fashioned way. Example:

      $ ftp kermit.columbia.edu
      User: anonymous
      Password: olga@xyzcorp.com
      ftp> cd kermit/archives
      ftp> binary
      ftp> get cku301.tar.gz
      ftp> bye
      $
    

  4. If you downloaded a compressed tar file, uncompress it. Examples:

      $ gunzip cku301.tar.gz
      $ uncompress cku301.tar.Z
    

  5. If you downloaded a tar archive, "un-tar" it. Example:

      $ tar xvf cku301.tar
    

    If you downloaded a Zip archive, unzip it. Example:

      $ unzip -a cku301.zip
    

  6. Now you can delete the tar archive (or zip archive) if you wish:

      $ rm cku301.tar                 (or rm cku301.zip)
    

  7. Read the comments at the top of the makefile to find out which target is appropriate for your computer and operating system, and then give the appropriate "make" command. Examples:

      $ make linux                    (Linux any version)
      $ make macosx                   (Mac OS X)
      $ make freebsd                  (FreeBSD)
      $ make solaris10                (Solaris 8 with cc)
      $ make solaris10g               (Solaris 8 with gcc)
      $ make irix65                   (IRIX 6.5)
    

  8. Rename (or copy, or link) the resulting "wermit" binary to match the naming conventions in the C-Kermit binaries table. In most cases, this would be:

      cku301.makefiletarget-architecture-osversion
    

    Examples of architecture names (please don't use hyphens in the names):

    Name Description
    i386 32-bit PC
    x86_64 64-bit PC
    ppc 32-bit PowerPC
    ppc64 64-bit PowerPC
    sparc 32-bit Sun Sparc
    sparc64 64-bit Sun Sparc
    ia64 64-bit Itanium
    mips MIPS
    parisc HP PA-RISC
    m68k Motorola 680x0
    vax 32-bit DEC VAX
    alpha 64-bit DEC Alpha
    Examples:

      cku301.linux-i386-db6.0         (Debian Linux 6.0 on a PC)
      cku301.linux-alpha-rhel4        (Red Hat Linux EL4 on the Alpha)
      cku301.macosx-ppc-10.4.11       (Mac OS X 10.4.11 on PowerMac)
      cku301.macosx-x86_64-10.6.7     (Mac OS X 10.6.7 on 64-bit PC)
      cku301.solaris11-i386           (Solaris 11 on PC)
    

    For some platforms, additional information must be included in the name. For Silicon Graphics IRIX, for example, we need the Instruction Set Architecture (MIPS level) and the Application Binary Interface:

      cku301.irix53-mips2-o32-5.3
      cku301.irix65-mips3-n32-6.5.14m
    

  9. If you want to make another binary, use the "clean" target to remove the object files:
      $ make clean
    

    and then go back to step 7.

  10. Upload the binary (or binaries) you have built to the Kermit FTP site. You can use any FTP client for this. Example:

      $ cp -p wermit cku301.irix65-mips3-n32.6.5
      $ ftp kermit.columbia.edu
      User: anonymous
      Password: your-email-address
      ftp> cd kermit/incoming
      ftp> binary
      ftp> put cku301.irix65-mips3-n32.6.5
      ftp> bye
      $
    

  11. If you compress the binary (it's not required), be sure to include the appropriate compression suffix (.Z or .gz) in the filename. This example uses the Kermit FTP client from the binary you just built on (say) Debian Linux 8.0 (which doesn't exist yet):

      $ cp -p wermit cku301.linux-i386-db8.0
      $ gzip cku301.linux-i386-db8.0
      $ ./wermit
      $ C-Kermit> ftp kermit.columbia.edu
      Name: anonymous
      Password: olga@xyzcorp.com
      C-Kermit> cd kermit/incoming
      C-Kermit> binary
      C-Kermit> put cku301.linux-i386-db8.0.gz
      C-Kermit> bye
      C-Kermit> exit
      $
    

  12. Send e-mail to kermit@kermitproject.org and let us know that you uploaded a binary and give any relevant information: machine/OS model and particulars, any error messages or warnings, any changes you had to make to the build procedure or source code.

  13. To install the version of Kermit you have just built, read the installation instructions.

Thanks!

VMS

  1. Check the binaries table to make sure the binary you are about to make is not already there, or is not at the current C-Kermit release level (i.e. 9.0.301).

  2. Make a fresh directory and SET DEFAULT to it. Example:

      $ create/directory kermit
      $ set default [.kermit]
    

  3. Download the VMS source code Zip archive. Click on the download link or do it by hand the old-fashioned way. Example:

      $ ftp kermit.columbia.edu
      User: anonymous
      Password: olga@xyzcorp.com
      ftp> cd kermit/archives
      ftp> binary
      ftp> get ckv301.zip
      ftp> bye
      $
    

    Or use the Internet Kermit service as described above.

  4. Unpack the Zip archive. Example:

      $ unzip -a ckv301.zip
    

  5. Run the build procedure to make a "no-net" version (i.e. a version that does not have TCP/IP networking built in:

      $ @ckvker n
    

    If you have a pre-5.0 VMS release, use the "old" build procedure:

      $ @ckvold n
    

    If you experience any trouble, read the comments at the top of the build procedure.

  6. Rename the resulting WERMIT.EXE binary to match the naming conventions in the C-Kermit binaries table:

      ckv301-architecture-vmsNN-nonet.exe
    

    where architecture is "vax", "axp", or "i64"; NN is the VMS version number, such as "72" for 7.2, and "nonet" means no networking. Examples:

      ckv301-vax-vms47-nonet.exe
      ckv301-axp-vms62-nonet.exe
      ckv301-i64-vms83-nonet.exe
    

  7. If you have a TCP/IP product installed, create a second binary with TCP/IP networking built in:

      $ @ckvker
    

    (or @ckvold for VMS 4.x or earlier).

  8. Rename the second WERMIT.EXE binary like the first one, except this time include the TCP/IP product and version:

      ckv301-architecture-vmsNN-netVV.exe
    

    where netVV is a three-letter code for the network product and its two-digit version number (with no decimal point):

      ucx  DEC TCP/IP
      tgv  TGV MultiNet
      pst  Process Software TCPware
      twg  The Wollongong Group WIN/TCP or PathWay
      cmu  Carnegie-Mellon University CMU/IP

    Examples:

      ckv301-vax-vms55-ucx20.exe
      ckv301-axp-vms62-tgv41.exe
      ckv301-axp-vms73-ucx51.exe
      ckv301-i64-vms83-ucx56.exe
    

  9. If you want to make more binaries, use the build procedure's "c" option to remove the object files:
      $ @ckvker c
    

    and then go back to step 5.

  10. Upload the binary (or binaries) you have built to ftp://kermit.columbia.edu/kermit/incoming/. You can use FTP or Kermit. Example:

      $ ftp kermit.columbia.edu
      User: anonymous
      Password: olga@xyzcorp.com
      FTP> cd kermit/incoming
      FTP> binary
      FTP> mput ckv301*.exe
      FTP> bye
      $
    

  11. Send e-mail to kermit@kermitproject.org and let us know that you uploaded a binary and give any relevant information: machine/OS model and particulars, any error messages or warnings, any changes you had to make to the build procedure or source code.

  12. To install the version of Kermit you have just built, read the installation instructions.

Thanks!

Other

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C-Kermit 9.0 / Columbia University / kermit@kermitproject.org / 27 September 2011